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SCHGDL (/COMMERCE 

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Announcement 

1912-1913 





SCHC^Lq^CgMMERCE 



Announcement 

1912—1913 




Evanston 

Published by the University 

June, 1912 



Calendar 



1912-1913 

1912 

September 23-28 Registration Week 

September 26, Thursday. .. .Class work in College of Liberal 

Arts begins 
September 27, Friday Opening Night 

October 2, Wednesday. . .Regular evening class work begins 

November 27, 28, 29 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 23, Monday Christmas recess to January 5 

1913 

January 6, Monday Class work resumed 

January 27, Monday Mid-year examinations begin 

February 10, Monday Second semester begins 

May 19, Monday Second semester examinations begin 

May 29, Thursday. .. .Last day of instruction 

June 11, Wednesday. .. Fifty-fifth Annual Commence- 

ment 



Board of Guarantors 



Alfred L. Baker 
Adolphus Clay Bartlett 
Harold Benington 
Charles L. Brown 
Jonathan W. Brooks 
R. S. Buchanan 
Edward B. Butler 
J. Fred Butler 
Fayette S. Cable 
Eliada J. Cady 
James Robert Cardwell 
John Alexander Cooper 
Joseph H. DeFrees 
A. Lowes Dickinson 
Herman J. Dirks 
George W. Dixon 
William A. Dyche 
Charles W. Folds 
David R. Forgan 
Edward E. Gore 
Richard C. Hall 
William F. Hypes 
J. Porter Joplin 
William Kendall 
Edward Chester Kimbell 
Charles S. Ludlam 
John Lee Mahin 
Charles A. Marsh 
James Marwick 
Stephen T. Mather 



L. Wilbur Messer 

E. M. Mills 

S. Roger Mitchell 
Arthur G. Mitten 
Luman S. Pickett 
Ernest Reckitt 
William Hinman Roberts 
Isadore B. Rosenbach 
Albert W. Rugg 
Joseph Schafmer 
Charles H. Schweppe 
John W. Scott 
Elijah W. Sells 
Ernest W. Seatree 
Archibald Wilkinson Shaw 
George W. Sheldon 
Edward M. Skinner 
Allen R. Smart 
Mason B. Starring 
Joseph E. Sterrett 
Homer A. Stillwell 
Seymour Walton 
Harry A. Wheeler 

F. F. White 
John E. Wilder 
T. Edward Wilder 
Orva G. Williams 
Henry W. Wilmot 
W. A. Winterburn 
Arthur Young, 



Faculty 

Abram Winegardner Harris, Sc. D., LL.D. 
President of the University. 

Willard Eugene Hotchkiss, A.M., Ph.D. 
Dean and Professor of Economic and Social Science. 

Walter Dill Scott, Ph.D. 
Professor of Advertising. 

Earl Dean Howard, A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Banking and Finance. 

Frederick Shipp Deibler, Ph.D. 
Professor of Economics. 

Alfred William Bays, B.S., LL.B. 

Assistant Professor of Business Law. 

Arthur Edward Andersen, C.P.A. 
Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Walter Edward Lagerquist, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Economics and Commerce. 

Horace Secrist, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Economics. 

William Dunton Kerr, A.B., LL.B. 
Instructor in Transportation. 

Guy Van Schaick, B.L., J.B. 
Instructor in Commercial Spanish and Commercial French. 

Arthur Emil Swanson, Ph.D. 
Instructor in Economics and Business Organization. 

Walter Kay Smart, Ph.D. 
Lecturer in Business English. 

Walter Sheldon Tower, Ph.D. 
Lecturer in Resources and Trade. 

Louis G. Groebe, C.P.A. 
Lecturer in Accounting. 

Neva Olive Lesley 
Secretary. 



Special Lecturers 



1911-1912 

Roger W. Babson 
Proprietor, "The Babson Reports," Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

W. C. Boorn 
General Agent, Hartford Fire Insurance Company, Chicago 

George B. Caldwell 

Manager Bond Department, Continental and Commercial Trust and 
Savings Bank 

Mark W. Cresap 
Credit Manager, Hart, Schaffner & Marx, Chicago 

A. P. Johnson 
Advertising Manager, The Chicago Record-Herald 

Bowman C. Lingle 
Manager Bond Department, Harris Trust and Savings Bank 

Albert C. MacMahan 
Sales Department, National Cash Register Co., Chicago 

Frank L. Macomber 
Credit Manager, Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co., Chicago 

John Lee Mahin 
President, Mahin Advertising Company, Chicago 

Raymond G. Schaeffer 
Advertising Manager, Tobey Furniture Co., Chicago 

Frank Schraeder 
Statistical Department, N. W. Halsey Banking Co., Chicago 

Edward Suffern 
President, American Society of Certified Public Accountants 



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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/announcements191213nort 



The School of Commerce 



Northwestern University School of Commerce was organized 
in June, 1908, when sixty business men of Chicago, members of the 
Chicago Association of Commerce, the Illinois Society of Certified 
Public Accountants, and the Industrial Club of Chicago, assumed 
financial responsibility for the School during the first three years of 
its existence. The cooperation of these men in founding a University 
School of Commerce was brought about largely through the efforts 
of Mr. Joseph Schaffner. 

During the past four years the School of Commerce has con- 
ducted evening courses in business calculated to meet the needs of 
business men in Chicago who are employed during the da}\ For a 
systematic course covering four evenings a week during three academic 
years, a diploma in Commerce has been granted, but business men 
have been encouraged to pursue any of the particular subjects in 
which they have been interested, whether or not they were in a posi- 
tion to complete a full diploma course. 

In order to lay the foundation for a degree course in Business 
Administration, provision has been made whereby students who have 
completed two years of college work can pursue the subjects embraced 
in the first year of a degree course, in day classes. It is expected 
that this year of work will be followed by two years of further study 
and that the whole course to be developed will comprise a careful 
and comprehensive study of the different branches of business. The 
course will involve a thorough inquiry into the principles of business 
organization and management, and the application of principles to 
specific problems. 

Northwestern University- School of Commerce occupies a favor- 
able position for developing work in this field. The school is 
equipped with library and other facilities besides being in close 
proximity to the large libraries of the city. Location in the heart of 
Chicago offers a wealth of material for study and observation, and 
the advantage of location is greatly enhanced by a plan of organization 
which insures close cooperation with progressive and public-spirited 
business men. Adequate financial provision is made for research along 
business lines and for continued development and enrichment of 
instruction. 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



The School of Commerce aims to equip its students with the 
essentials of business practice, and to train them in the fundamental 
principles underlying efficient policy. Following procedure long 
recognized in laboratory science, business data is subjected to pains- 
taking analysis and a careful weighing of cause and effect. Effort is 
made, moreover, to develop a capacity to grasp the ultimate and pub- 
lic aspects of business situations and to harmonize efficiency with 
considerations of public welfare. It is believed that scientific and 
cultural methods employed in the best university instruction are well 
calculated to advance these ends and to promote in business the 
development of definite professional standards. 



Admission 

Degree Course 

Provisions for the degree course are based upon the satisfactory 
completion of two years of college work. Applicants for admis- 
sion to that course will be required to satisfy college entrance require- 
ments and to offer in preparation two full years of study in a 
university, college, or scientific school of approved standing. They 
will be expected to have completed during the two college years a 
full year course covering the principles of economics. Students who 
enter the school with three years of college work will usually be 
able to shorten by one year the time required for securing the degree. 

SUGGESTIONS for courses to be pursued during the two years 

OF COLLEGE WORK REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
DEGREE COURSE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The courses scheduled below are suggested as furnishing a good 
cultural and disciplinary basis for the later work in Business Admin- 
istration. First of all, students should have a thorough ground- 
ing in English. Those who are contemplating a course preparatory 
to taking up certain lines of manufacture may wish to take further 
work in science as well as courses in engineering. For students who 
wish to study the actuarial side of life insurance or to pursue advanced 
work in statistics, some further courses in mathematics are recom- 
mended. Work in History and Political Science will be advantageous 
not only for students looking toward the public service, but likewise 
for those preparing for active business. A course in Economic His- 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 



tory may well precede the Principles of Economics. Effort should be 
made to take this course during the two years of college work. 

With the exception of the Principles of Economics, the faculty 
of the School of Commerce will not prescribe any particular course or 
courses to be pursued during the two years of college residence. The 
general principle to be followed is to secure as broad a cultural 
foundation as possible. It is the policy of the School of Commerce 
to discourage too close specialization until the work in Business 
Administration is undertaken; and even in this work the idea of 
securing a broad fundamental training will predominate. 

SCHEDULE OF COLLEGE COURSES SUGGESTED 
FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English 3 hours English 2 hours 

Foreign Language 3 hours Foreign Language. .. .3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours Economics 3 hours 

Science 4 hours History and Political 

Economic History 3 hours Science 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Within this schedule are included all the required subjects pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Liberal Arts. For entrance 
requirements and other details pertaining to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science, see University Catalogue. 

Diploma Course 

Applicants for admission to the evening courses leading to a 
diploma in commerce are asked to submit a detailed statement setting 
forth their education and business experience. If this statement 
properly attested, gives evidence of sufficient maturity and training 
to enable the applicant to pursue the work with profit he is admitted 
to the diploma course. Applicants must be at least eighteen years of 
age, and those under twenty-one must have completed a four year 
course in an approved high school. 

Individual Courses 

Persons who are qualified for admission to the diploma course 
but who are not in a position to undertake the complete course, may 
register for any particular evening courses for which they are pre- 
pared. In limited numbers such persons may register for day courses 
upon vote of the faculty. Work completed in individual courses 
will be duly credited should the student later wish to qualify for 
the diploma. 



10 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Diploma and Degree 

Requirements for a Degree in Business Administration 1 

By vote of the Board of Trustees, January 9, 19 12, a course 
of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business Administra- 
tion was approved. Under the plan outlined students who enter 
upon the work with the minimum requirement of two years of college 
work will require not less than three full academic years to complete 
the course. It is expected that persons of good ability who enter the 
school after completing three full years of college work will usually 
be able to. complete the work in two years. The degree will not be 
awarded, however, merely as result of pursuing a specified number 
of courses. Each student will be expected to realize that all his 
work will be in preparation for his future career and to acquire an 
ability to deal effectually with business problems in the field he intends 
to enter. Those who expect to enter upon a degree course in business 
administration should aim to include in the college course as many 
as possible of the subjects covered in the first year of the course in 
business administration. 

Requirements for the Diploma in Commerce 1 

Candidates for the diploma in Commerce must have completed 
the equivalent of twelve courses, requiring normally four evenings a 
week for three years. All diploma students are required to take one 
year each in Accounting, Business Law, Economics, and Finance. 
In addition they must give evidence of satisfactory proficiency in 
English. Of the twelve subjects required for the diploma, at least 
nine must be other than language courses. English will not be 
credited toward a diploma. For students whose other duties will 
not permit them to carry four subjects a week, a four-year course of 
three evenings a week is recommended. 

Relation of Degree Students to Evening Courses in the 
School of Commerce 

A considerable part of the day work given during the academic 
year 1912-1913 will be offered in the regular college classes in Evans- 
ton, but students will pursue at least one subject in evening courses 
offered in Chicago. In developing the second and third years of 



*A candidate for a Degree or for a Diploma, offering advance credit from 
other institutions, is required to pursue at least one full year's work under 
the direction of the faculty of the School of Commerce. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 11 

the course, provision will likewise be made whereby some portion 
of the degree work will be carried on in courses attended by persons 
who are occupying business positions. The day and evening work 
will be arranged so as not to encumber the schedule of students in 
the degree course and it is believed that a moderate amount of partici- 
pation in the same work by persons with business experience on the 
one hand, and persons whose training has been primarily academic 
on the other, will be mutually beneficial. 

Relation of Degree Course to the Work in the College 
of Liberal Arts 

The arrangement of subjects during the first year of the course 
in Business Administration contemplates that a major portion of the 
work covered during that year shall be done in Evanston and that 
students will be registered in the College of Liberal Arts. Students 
will thus secure at the same time the benefits of membership in the 
college community and the viewpoint of business men as represented 
by students in the evening courses. The schedule is so arranged that 
the work can be carried on in the two places without serious loss of 
time and energy. 

Combined Liberal Arts and Business Administration Course 

The provisions above outlined contemplate that students in the 
College of Liberal Arts of Northwestern University will be able to 
begin work in business administration during their third college year. It 
is expected that with the development of the later years of the degree 
course, such students will be able to secure both the college degree 
and the degree in Business Administration by a combined course cov- 
ering five years of study. Persons who are about to enter college 
with the thought of following their college work with a course in busi- 
ness administration will find the curriculum and the requirements for 
a degree in the College of Liberal Arts of Northwestern University 
well adapted to their needs. 



12 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Outline of the First Year of Study for a Degree 
Course in Business Administration 

TO BE OFFERED DURING THE ACADEMIC YEAR I912-I913 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, EVANSTON 

First Principles of Accounting Professor Andersen 

second semester. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-5 

An introduction to the study of Accounting adapted primarily 
to the demands of general business. It will also serve as a preparatory 
course for students who propose to pursue further study in the field 
of Accountancy. The course will aim to give students without 
previous accounting experience an intelligent understanding of 
fundamental principles. Attention will be given to the evolution of 
bookkeeping practice from the elementary single entry system to 
modern double entry methods. A survey, as far as possible compre- 
hensive, will be made of the methods of analyzing receipts, disburse- 
ments, assets and liabilities in general lines of industry and of show- 
ing profit, loss, and valuation. Some attention will be given to cost 
keeping, depreciation, sinking funds and other subjects with which 
business men are concerned. Students will be expected to keep a 
practice set of books, and practice will also be given in the analysis 
and interpretation of published accounts of corporations. 

Business Law Professor Bays 

first semester. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-5 

This course is intended to comprise those subjects which are indis- 
pensable to the business man in general. The work will be accom- 
panied by the study of cases, by class discussions, and by drafting of 
various legal papers. The course will cover the following topics: 

1. Elementary Law. Legal divisions and legal terminology; 
definition of rights, wrongs, and remedies ; the composition of Ameri- 
can law, English common law, constitutional and statutory law; the 
judicial system and the status of reported decisions and opinions. 

2. General Law of Contracts. The formation of contracts 
including the necessary elements; different kinds of contracts, legality 
of particular agreements; forms and evidences of contract; the opera- 
tion of contract, performance, breach; transfer and assignment of 
contract; damages for breach of contract. Students will be given 
practice in the drafting of simple contracts covering the several points 
discussed. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 13 

3. Sales of Personal Property. Characteristics of this form 
of contract ; passing of ownership ; warranties, express and implied ; 
rights of third parties; performance and breach of contract as applied 
to sales. 

4. Law of Business Relationships: Agency — Partnership — 
Corporations. 

The law of agency as fundamental to partnerships and corpora- 
tions whose activities are carried on by agents and servants. Law 
of agency as applied to principal and agent and to master and servant ; 
formation of these relationships and the rights and duties arising in 
connection with various classes of agency, with factors, brokers and 
auctioneers. 

Partnerships, their formation; rights and duties of partners; 
authority to represent firm; sale of interest; dissolution by death, 
withdrawals and other ways. 

Corporations, comparison with partnerships; legal advantages 
and disadvantages; charter, how procured; powers and authority of 
corporation; duties of officers; rights, duties and disabilities of stock- 
holders and directors ; ultra vires acts ; laws of different states ; foreign 
corporations; trusts and monopolies; dissolution of corporation. 

5. Negotiable Paper. Bills of exchange, promissory notes and 
checks; elements necessary to negotiability; transfer; responsibility of 
endorsers; holders in due course; discharge of negotiable paper. 

Students will be given an opportunity to perform independent 
work in addition to the regular class exercises, for which an hour of 
credit will be assigned. 

Money, Banking and Credit (Economics B Q ) Professor Howard 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9. 

This course aims to give the student an acquaintance with the 
elementary principles and practices of finance, especially as they 
concern the ordinary business man. A study is made of the causes 
which bring about the regular swings of prices and periods of alter- 
nate prosperity and depression. The student is expected to gain suffi- 
cient knowledge of credit and banking to enable him to avoid the 
commonest errors in managing and financing of ordinary business. 
Students may enter the course for the whole year or for either 
semester. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

(a) The Economics of Finance. The place of finance in our 
economic system; the financial principles arising from division of 
labor, private property, organization of industry, exchange, etc. 



14 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

(b) The Basis of Values. The underlying principles of value; 
capital and income, forms of capital investment — stocks and bonds 
and their value. 

(c) Money. The princples of money, a description of our 
monetary system, compared with that of other countries. The 
Greenback movement of the 7o's, the Free Silver movement, the 
Gold Standard. Demand and supply of gold. Legal tender. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

(a) Banking. The function of banks, the development of 
banking, foreign banking systems, the Bank of England. 

Deposits and bank notes; elastic currency; the Canadian system; 
pending currency legislation. 

The National Bank Act; state banking laws. The money mar- 
ket, call loans, rate of interest, the relation between the New York 
banks and Wall Street; the U. S. Treasury and Wall Street. The 
principles of foreign exchange. 

(b) Credit. Loans and the granting of bank credit. The 
credit man in the bank. The business of dealing in commercial 
paper. The principles of credit ; collateral, the personal equation. 

(c) Panics and Financial Crises. The great panics of 1837, 
1857, ^73, 1893. The Wall Street panics of 1901 and 1903. The 
panic of 1907. The nature and causes of panics. Plans for the 
mitigation of panics. 

Corporation Finance and Investments (Economics C 5 ) 

Professor Lagerquist 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10. 

This course covers the nature of the corporation ; methods of 
organization and promotion, and the functions and powers of the 
various officers. 

Special attention will be given to the corporation law of Illinois 
and a comparison of the advantages offered by the laws of other 
states. The methods of regulating corporations in the several states 
and by the Federal Government will also be studied, together with 
some of the most important court decisions in the prosecution of 
"Trusts." 

Chief emphasis is laid upon the problems of capitalization, the 
issue and sale of securities, and the proper management of capital 
funds and earnings. This is followed by a study of receiverships 
and reorganization. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 15 

The causes of failure will also be studied with the purpose of 
discovering the factors which insure safety in corporation manage- 
ment. 

The latter part of the course is more particularly devoted to 
the consideration of investment problems. This work will cover the 
organization and management of stock exchanges, underwriting and 
brokerage, speculation and price movements. Babson's reports on 
fundamental conditions and Gibson's market letters are discussed 
and criticised. 

Particular attention will be given to the stocks and bonds of rail- 
ways, public service companies, municipalities and miscellaneous forms 
of investment securities. The examination and interpretation of 
balance sheets and income accounts from the point of view of the 
investor will also be covered. 

(Elective for students who have completed one of the other 
courses listed in the first year program. Other students will pursue 
their work in this subject either in Evanston or Chicago during their 
second year in Business Administration.) 

General Psychology Professor Scott 

first semester. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 

An elementary course in the principles of Psychology accom- 
panied by classroom demonstration, showing the use of psychological 
apparatus, and aiding the student to independent observation. Stu- 
dents will be expected to perform experiments and prepare written 
exercises. 

Business Psychology Professor Scott 

second semester. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 

An intensive study of psychological principles which have the 
most direct application to business. Business practices are analyzed 
and an attempt is made to understand from a psychological stand- 
point some of the causes of successes and failures in business. In- 
dividual students study the actual and also the possible applications, 
in business of such factors as imitation, competition, loyalty, the love 
of the game, and personal differences. More attention is paid to 
advertising than to other forms of business. Open to students who 
have completed the course in General Psychology. 



16 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Transportation (Economics B 3 ) Professor Secrist 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1 1 

This course will be devoted to the history and present organiza- 
tion of the transportation systems of the United States. A general 
survey will be made of the organization of departments and of ques- 
tions pertaining to the passenger and freight traffic; also questions 
of railway finance. Finally, the relation of the railroad to the shipper 
and to the general public will be given consideraion. Under this 
head special attention will be given to the development of railway 
regulation and to the work of the Interstate Commerce Commission 
and of state commissions. 

Resources and Trade Professor Tower 

school of commerce, Chicago. Wednesday afternoons, 4:15-6:15 

The course aims to equip the student with a comprehensive 
understanding of the resources upon which the industries of this 
country are based. Comparison is made between these resources and 
those of foreign countries with which the United States sustains trade 
relations. Critical study will be given to the methods and processes 
by which various sorts of resources have been developed, paying atten- 
iton to proposals for the restoration, conservation and more economical 
utilization of all of the resources of the country. Especial emphasis 
will be given to the agricultural and mineral resources of the Missis- 
sippi Valley, upon which the present and future greatness of Chicago 
as a business center depends. Study will also be made of the distribu- 
tion of population in its relation to resources and to the development 
of industries and markets. Maps, charts, photographs and other 
illustrations showing the processes and the importance of particular 
industries, will be freely used. In addition, men who are in a position 
to speak with authority upon different lines of trade will give special 
lectures before the class. 

This course will be open to students who enter for the second 
semester as well as those who are enrolled for the year. 

Plan and Organization of Degree Course 

The thought underlying the course of study outlined for the first 
year in business administration is to give a general knowledge of 
activities most fundamental to business in general. It is expected that 
in the later years, classroom instruction will be offered only in suffi- 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 17 

cient amount to equip students with a necessary survey of the particular 
business field in which their interest is centered. In all of the work 
the knowledge of principles and the general grasp of the subject will 
be developed by a study of concrete business problems. It is intended 
that a large part of the work during the second year and the major 
portion of the work during the third year will consist of individual 
observation and investigation. 



18 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Description of Courses 

Evenings, Seven to Nine Unless Otherwise Indicated 

Accounting 

First Principles 

Accounting i-A Mondays Mr. Groebe 

An introduction to the study of Accounting adapted primarily 
to the demands of general business. It will also serve as a preparatory 
course for students who propose to pursue further study in the field 
of Accountancy. The course will aim to give students without 
previous accounting experience an intelligent understanding of 
fundamental principles. Attention will be given to the evolution of 
bookkeeping practice from the elementary single entry system to 
modern double entry methods. A survey, as far as possible compre- 
hensive, will be made of the methods of analyzing receipts, disburse- 
ments, assets and liabilities in general lines of industry and of show- 
ing profit, loss, and valuation. Some attention will be given to cost 
keeping, depreciation, sinking funds and other subjects with which 
business men are concerned. Students will be expected to keep a 
practice set of books, and practice will also be given in the analysis 
and interpretation of published accounts of corporations. 

Accounting I-B Mr. Groebe 

Friday afternoons, 4:15-6:15 



Accounting I-C 



Same as Accounting 1- A 



second. semester. Tuesdays and Thursdays (4 hours) 
Same as Accounting I-A 

This course will give students an opportunity to complete the 
elementary course during the second half-year. Given on sufficient 
registration. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 19 



Intermediate 

Accounting 1 1- A 

Mondays ' 

The course will deal with single proprietorship and partnership 
accounts; corporation accounts; special points connected with the 
issuing of capital stock, bonds and other securities, treatment of bond 
discounts, commissions and expenses, operation of sinking funds, 
declaration and payment of dividends and the preparation of financial 
statements and statements of profits and income. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to the distinction between capital and maintenance 
expenditures, realization, liquidation, receivers, executors' accounts, 
and to "Cost" accounts. Auditing and the theory of accounts will 
be thoroughly discussed. The course is intended to give the business 
man a more thorough grounding than can be secured in a single year 
of study and to prepare for more advanced study on the part of 
students who desire to become certified public accountants. Students 
will be expected to work out a considerable number of problems in 
Practical Accounting and in Auditing. 

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of an 
Accounting I course. 

Accounting n-B Fridays ■ 

Same as Accounting II-A 

Advanced 



Accounting ill Wednesdays Professor Andersen 

The course will involve an analytical discussion of credits, debits, 
assets, liabilities, good-will, depreciation, and reserves. Attention will 
be given to a discrimination between real and apparent profits and 
to the sources from which dividends should be paid. Brokerage accounts 
insurance accounts, contractors' accounts, consignments, adventures, 
accounts of clubs, building and loan associations, and of mergers and 
consolidations will be given special attention. The course is devoted 
largely to the theory underlying accounting practice. In connection 
with the lectures students are given questions usually taken from the 
Illinois C. P. A. examinations, to answer in writing, and these questions 
furnish the basis for later class discussion. This course aims to give 
students the fundamental preparation required for the C. P. A. 
examination. 



20 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Public Service Corporation Accounting Professor Andersen 

Mondays 

The course describes the application of accounting principles to 
railways, street railways, telephone, telegraph, gas, water, electric 
light and other public service corporations. Attention will be given to 
plant costs, treatment of interest discounts and securities, to going 
value, evaluation of franchises, maintenance expenditures, deprecia- 
tion, control over income and expenditures, principles of analyzing 
costs for determination of rates, preparation of financial statements, 
compilation of statistical data. The classification of accounts as pre- 
scribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Wisconsin, 
New York and other state commissions will be thoroughly analyzed 
and discussed. Reports submitted by experts in investigations of 
public service corporations will also be taken up. Open to students 
who have had the equivalent of an Accounting u course. 

Factory Cost Accounting Professor Andersen 

This course will deal with the accounting incident to the pur- 
chase, receipt and issue of raw and finished materials, payrolls, and 
factory expenses, and the scientific distribution thereof. Among other 
features it is proposed to take up issuance of shop orders; perpetual 
inventories; distinction between productive and non-productive labor; 
recording and paying of wages ; piece work, profit-sharing and premium 
or bonus systems ; distribution of factory overhead expenses ; treatment 
of rent and interest in costs; system of repair, renewal and construc- 
tion orders and the allocation of selling, distributing and administra- 
tive expenses. The use and value of graphic charts in the final assem- 
bly of data and statistics will receive special consideration. The cost 
accounting systems of several large and representative manufacturing 
companies will form the basis of the major portion of the lectures. 
Specimen forms will be extensively used and the relation of each to the 
general financial and cost accounting scheme will be thoroughly 
analyzed and discussed. 

This course will be open only to students who have completed 
the work in either the Intermediate or Advanced Accounting classes, 
or have already had practical experience along cost accounting lines. 
Not given in ipi2-ipi3. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 21 

Banking and Finance 

Money, Banking and Credit Thursdays Professor Howard 

This course aims to give the student an acquaintance with the 
elementary principles and practices of finance, especially as they 
concern the ordinary business man. A study is made of the causes 
which bring about the regular swings of prices and periods of alter- 
nate prosperity and depression. The student is expected to gain suffi- 
cient knowledge of credit and banking to enable him to avoid the 
commonest errors in managing the financing of ordinary business. 
Students may enter the course for the whole year or for either 
semester. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

(a) The Economics of Finance. The place of Finance in our 
economic system; the financial principles arising from division of 
labor, private property, organization of industry, exchange, etc. 

(b) The Basis of Values. The underlying principles of value; 
capital and income, forms of capital investment — stocks and bonds 
and their value. 

(c) Money. The principles of money, a description of our 
monetary system, compared with that of other countries. The 
Greenback movement of the 7o's, the Free Silver movement, the 
Gold Standard. Demand and supply of gold. Legal tender. 

SECOXD SEMESTER 

(a) Banking.. The function of banks, the development of 
banking, foreign banking systems, the Bank of England. 

Deposits and bank notes; elastic currency; the Canadian system; 
pending currency legislation. 

The National Bank Act ; state banking laws. The money mar- 
ket, call loans, rate of interest, the relation between the New York 
banks and Wall Street, the U. S. Treasury and Wall Street. The 
principles of foreign exchange. 

(b) Credit. Loans and the granting of bank credit. The 
credit man in the bank. The business of dealing in commercial 
paper. The principles of credit; collateral, the personal equation. 

(c) Panics and Financial Crises. The great panics of 1837, 
1857, 1873, 1893. The Wall Street panics of 1901 and 1903. The 
panic of 1907. The nature and causes of panics. Plans for the 
mitigation of panics. 



22 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Corporation Finance and Investments Professor Lagerquist 

Thursdays 

This course covers the nature of the corporation; methods of 
organization and promotion, and the functions and powers of the 
various officers. 

Special attention will be given to the corporation law of Illinois 
and a comparison of the advantages offered by the laws of other 
states. The methods of regulating corporations in the several states 
and by the Federal Government will also be studied, together with 
some of the most important court decisions in the prosecution of 
"Trusts." 

Chief emphasis is laid upon the problems of capitalization, the 
issue and sale of securities, and the proper management of capital 
funds and earnings. This is followed by a study of receiverships 
and reorganization. 

The causes of failure will also be studied with the purpose of 
discovering the factors which insure safety in corporation manage- 
ment. 

The latter part of the course is more particularly devoted to 
the consideration of investment problems. This work will cover the 
organization and management of stock exchanges, underwriting and 
brokerage, speculation and price movements. Babson's reports on 
fundamental conditions and Gibson's market letters are discussed 
and criticised. 

Particular attention will be given to the stocks and bonds of 
railways, public service companies, municipalities and miscellaneous 
forms of investment securities. The examination and interpretation 
of balance sheets and income accounts from the point of view of the 
investor will also be covered. 

Banking, Advanced Course Professor Howard 

This course is adapted to the needs of students who are prepar- 
ing for banking, brokerage or bond and mortgage business. The 
chief emphasis lies on the nature of credit and the administrative 
methods of houses dealing in credit, especially the commercial bank. 
Attention is given to the classification of loans and discounts, the 
distribution of funds among these classes; methods of the credit 
department ; the handling of foreign and domestic exchange ; the 
relations with correspondents; the handling of customers' accounts 
and the extension of business. An effort is made to compare methods 
in vogue in different parts of the United States, and practices of 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 23 

foreign institutions are studied in so far as such study is regarded 
useful to American bank officers. A careful study will be made of 
our banking law, the administration of the Comptroller's office and 
the conduct of examinations. In so far as may be pertinent, atten- 
tion will be drawn to the banking law and the practice of the bank- 
ing departments of the principal states. Open to students who have 
completed Money, Banking and Credit. Not given in Ipl^-Ipl3. 



Business Law 

Business Law I Tuesdays Professor Bays 

This -course is intended to comprise those subjects which are 
indispensable to the business man in general. The work will be 
accompanied by the study of cases, by class discussion, and by draft- 
ing of various legal papers. The course will cover the following 
topics : 

i. Elementary Law. Legal divisions and legal terminology; 
definition of rights, wrongs, and remedies; the composition of Ameri- 
can law, English common law, constitutional and statutory law; the 
judicial system and the status of reported decisions and opinions. 

2. General Law of Contracts. The formation of contracts, 
including the necessary elements ; different kinds of contracts, legality 
of particular agreements; forms and evidences of contract; the opera- 
tion of contract, performance, breach ; transfer and assignment of 
contract; damages for breach of contract. Students will be given 
practice in the drafting of simple contracts covering the several points 
discussed. 

3. Sales of Personal Property. Characteristics of this form 
of contract ; passing of ownership ; warranties, express and implied ; 
rights of third parties; performance and breach of contract as applied 
to sales. 

4. Law of Business Relationships: Agency — Partnership — 
Corporations. 

The law of agency as fundamental to partnerships and corpora- 
tions whose activities are carried on by agents and servants. Law 
of agency as applied to principal and agent and to master and servant; 
formation of these relationships and the rights and duties arising in 
connection with various classes of agency, with factors, brokers and 
auctioneers. 

Partnerships, their formation; rights and duties of partners; 



24 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

authority to represent firm; sale of interest; dissolution by death, 
withdrawals and other ways. 

Corporations, comparison with partnerships; legal advantages 
and disadvantages; charter, how procured; powers and authority of 
corporation; duties of officers; rights, duties and disabilities of stock- 
holders and directors; ultra vires acts; laws of different states; foreign 
corporations; trusts and monopolies; dissolution of corporation. 

5. Negotiable Paper. Bills of exchange, promissory notes and 
checks; elements necessary to negotiability; transfer; responsibility of 
endorsers; holders in due course; discharge of negotiable paper. 

Students will be given an opportunity to perform independent 
work in addition to the regular class exercises, for which an hour of 
credit will be assigned. 

Business Law II Fridays Professor Bays 

1. Real Estate Law. Estates in real property, sale, mortgage, 
lease; devolution of title upon death of owner, by inheritance, by will. 
The course aims to cover all the phases of ownership and transfer of 
real property of importance to the layman. Students will be expected 
to draft deeds of sale, mortgages and leases. 

2. Trademarks and Unfair Competition. What constitutes fair 
and unfair competition; right to copy methods of competitors; trade- 
marks, their legal status; what constitutes infringement. Attention 
will be given to recent developments, increasing the significance of 
this branch of the law. 

3. Debtor, Creditor and Bankruptcy. Rights of creditor 
against debtor and debtor's property; forms of indebtedness; methods 
of enforcing claim; debtor's exemption; discharge of indebtedness; 
bankruptcy, common law and statutory provision, Federal Bankruptcy 
Act. 

4. Insurance. Contract of insurance; legal phases of life insur- 
ance and property insurance; legal rights under different forms of 
policy. 

5. Suretyship. Different forms of suretyship and the rights 
and duties of the parties under each form. 

6. Banks and Banking. This subject is supplementary to the 
law of negotiable paper; it involves in addition the liability of stock- 
holders in banks; organization of banks under national and state 
laws ; duties of bank in respect to depositors and to payees of checks ; 
liability upon collections. 

Law and Policy of Industrial Combinations. See Industry, page 29. 
Railroad Law. See Transportation, page 31 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 25 

Commerce 

Resources and Trade Professor Tower 

Wednesday afternoons, 4:15-6:15. 

The course aims to equip the student with a comprehensive 
understanding of the resources upon which the industries of this 
country are based. Comparison is made between these resources and 
those of foreign countries with which the United States sustains 
trade relations. Critical study will be given to the methods and 
processes by which various sorts of resources have been developed, 
pa)qng attention to proposals for the restoration, conservation and 
more economical utilization of all the resources of the country. 
Especial emphasis will be given to the agricultural and mineral 
resources of the Mississippi Valley, upon which the present and future 
greatness of Chicago as a business center depends. Study will also 
be made of the distribution of population in its relation to resources 
and to the devolopment of industries and markets. Maps, charts, 
photographs and other illustrations showing the processes and the 
importance of particular industries, will be freely used. In addi- 
tion, men who are in a position to speak with authority upon different 
lines of trade will give special lectures before the classs. 

This course will be open to students who enter for the second 
semester as well as those who are enrolled for the year. 

Principles of Business Organization and Management 

Thursdays Dr. Swanson 

(A semester course to be repeated in the second semester on Tuesdays) 

This course will consider business organization from the point 
of view of capitalization, location, arrangement of plant and equip- 
ment and the organization of administrative machinery. It will also 
consider the manner in which specialization may occur in different 
branches of the business or in different territories. Attention will be 
given to such questions as ownership control, the distribution of 
authority, the securing of information, costs, elimination of friction, 
introduction of economies, efficiency of personnel, and in general to 
the effectiveness of administrative policies. Such outside factors as 
banks, service agencies, supply houses, customers, competing concerns 
and their relation to the individual business will be studied. In con- 
nection with the securing of information by the management, study 
will be given to the methods of ascertaining, classifying, distributing 
and interpreting facts and to the ways in which they should be made 









26 


Courses Offered in the Sc 




Evenings, 7 to 9, unl 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wed 


Accounting I-A 


Business Law I 


Resources anc 
4^5 


Accounting I I-A 


English I 


Accounting L 


Public Service Corporation 


Commercial Organization 




Accounting 


(ist semester) 


Economics 


Economic Problems 


Principles of Business Organ- 
ization (2nd semester) 


English II 


Business Psychology 




Industrial C< 




Accounting I-C 


Efficiency 




(2nd semester) 






Commercial French 





Commerce Work 



Monday 


Tuesday 


Wee 


Money and Banking 
(Economics B 6 ) 

Corporation Finance 
(Economics C 5 ) 


9 
10 


Business Law I 3 — 5 
(ist semester) 

Accounting I 3 — 5 
(2nd semester) 


Money and I 

Corporation J 

General Psyc 
(ist semes' 


General Psychology 
(ist semester) 


10 




Business Psyc 
(2nd seme 


Business Psychology 
(2nd semester) 


10 




Transportatic 


Transportation 
(Economics B 3 ) 


11 







3l of Commerce, Chicago 

otherwise indicated 



27 



iDAY 


Thursday 


Friday 


rade 

>:i5 


Money and Banking 

Corporation Finance and In- 
vestments 


Accounting I-B 

4:15—6:15 

Accounting II-B 




Principles of Business Organ- 
ization (ist semester) 


Business Law II 


jlidation and 


Industrial Organization 
(2nd semester) 

Accounting I-C 
(2nd semester) 






Commercial Spanish 





fered in Evanston 






5DAY 


Thursday 


Friday 


ring 


9 


Business Law I 3 — 5 
(ist semester) 


Money and Banking 


9 


ince 


10 


Accounting I 3 — 5 


Corporation Finance 


10 


m 




(2nd semester) 


General Psychology 






10 




( ist semester) 


10 


Dgy 






Business Psychology 




) 


10 




(2nd semester) 


10 




11 




Transportation 


11 



28 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

available to the different branches of the business. The purpose of 
the course is to develop the principles by which the administrator may 
secure and apply the information and control required for efficient 
organization. To this end the fullest possible use will be made of 
concrete problems drawn from actual experience. 

Commercial Organization Tuesdays Dr. Swanson 

FIRST SEMESTER 

This course embraces the wholesale and retail trades and buying 
and selling activities of manufacturing establishments. Study will be 
made of the manner in which goods are distributed and marketed by 
commercial and manufacturing concerns. Sales to the regular trade, 
to dealers and agents, and to the consumer direct, will be considered. 
Special sales policies like selling through salesmen, selling by mail, 
and the combination and adaptation of different policies will receive 
consideration in studying the activities of wholesalers, retailers, com- 
mission houses and brokers. Sales, advertising, credit and collection 
policies will be considered with a view to determining their merits 
and to what lines of business different policies are suited. Attention 
will be given to functional specialization or the "staff system," to the 
"committee system," and to the manner in which different systems 
can be utilized to insure proper reporting and distribution of informa- 
tion, and to increase cooperation and general efficiency. The function 
of statistics in different departments is studied and attention is directed 
toward the kinds of information that are valuable to each department 
head, the manner in which this information may be acquired and 
classified, the interpretation of records, and the methods employed to 
make the information available to those concerned. The study of 
organization in each department will include a description and dis- 
cussion of the departmental organization of a number of representa- 
tive firms. 



Economics 

Principles of Economics Wednesdays Professor Lagerquist 

The aim of this course will be to give students an appreciation 
of the principles underlying the business activities of the community, 
and to enable them to apply sound economic reasoning to the prac- 
tical affairs of business life. The first part of the course will be 
concerned largely with establishing, through discussion and illus- 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 29 

tration drawn from concrete experience, the principles upon which 
values are based. 

The greater part of the course will be devoted to the application 
of the principles of value as determining the production, exchange 
and distribution of wealth. This work will involve the discussion 
of many practical business problems such as the determination of 
wages, profits and interest rates, money and credit, taxation, trade 
unions and transportation rates. 

Economic Problems Mondays Professor Deibler 

Industrial conditions arising out of concentration of industry. 
Economic progress of the last century; the development of resources; 
improved methods of production. Development of industrial classes. 
Business as affected by the consuming capacity of the population; 
comparison of the consuming capacity of American with foreign popu- 
lations. The labor problem in different parts of the world; the 
development of trade unions; present status of unionism; influence 
of unions in business organization; different policies toward unions. 
Consolidations of capital; effects of consolidation on business or- 
ganization. Discussion of present economic conditions in business. 

The Labor Question Professor Deibler 

This course will be devoted to a study of the economic and social 
conditions surrounding the working classes in Europe and America 
and of the effect of such conditions upon production and social 
efficiency. Study will be made of the development of labor organiza- 
tions at home and abroad and of the relation of this development to 
business and business policies. Attention will be given to the labor 
conditions in the principal industries of the United States, to the 
existing relations between employers and employes, to collective bar- 
gaining, strikes and lock-outs, the open and closed shop, to methods 
for avoiding and adjusting labor disputes, and to factory legislation. 
The rights and powers of the community in dealing with industrial 
conditions will be studied especially as illustrated by recent laws and 
judicial decisions. Finally, a study will be made of the effect of 
industrial conditions upon the public welfare, and the rights and 
powers of the community to deal therewith. 

In addition to the regular class exercises students in the degree 
course will be required to study and report upon actual problems con- 
nected with concrete labor situations. This work will carry an 
additional hour of credit. Not given in 1912-1913. 



30 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Industry 

Industrial Organization Thursdays Dr. Swanson 

SECOND SEMESTER 

This course will be introduced by a survey of the organization 
and management of manufacturing establishments. Attention will be 
directed to the evolution of industrial organization, the types of 
organization employed at present, the factors which induce or inhibit 
centralization or disintegration in organization, the general factors 
which determine the location of industries, and an interpretation of 
efficiency as applied to organization and management. A special study 
will be made of the factors of location as they apply to different kinds 
of manufacture and a similar study of plant and equipment. Separate 
consideration will be given to the principles of organization as ap- 
plied to each department, such as Order, Production or Planning, 
Purchase, Stores and Stock, Shipping, Receiving, Engineering and 
Drafting. 

With regard to management as differentiated from organization 
an attempt will be made to present policies employed to secure efficient 
cooperation, wage systems evolved to effect better results for the em- 
ployer and the employe, methods used with a view to securing neces- 
sary information and analyzing conditions within and without the 
organization, and the methods employed in correcting evils. An im- 
portant part of this work will be the solution of concrete problems 
drawn from actual business experience. 

Industrial Engineering 

The object of this course is to afford a practical study of such 
engineering problems as are intimately associated with managerial 
work. It is especially intended for students who have not had a 
technical training but who expect to be in position where they will 
have more or less to do with engineering problems. The courses will 
include a consideration of the elementary principles of mechanical 
and civil engineering, power and power machinery, the principles of 
construction and plant lighting, heating, ventilation and sanitation. 
Atention will also be given to physical organization of departments, 
communication between departments, facilities for transfer of goods 
within the plant and for receiving, loading and shipping goods. Care- 
ful study will be made of specific problems of construction drawn 
from actual experience, and principles will be developed from the 
lessons which such problems teach. Not given in 1912-1913. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 31 

Markets and Marketing Dr. Swanson 

This course aims to give the student a thorough knowledge of 
the manner in which the different articles of commerce are distributed 
and marketed in the United States and in foreign countries. Atten- 
tion will be given to the marketing of domestic goods in foreign 
countries as compared with methods employed by merchants of other 
countries, notably of Germany and England. A study will be made 
of the operation and regulation of produce and commodity exchanges ; 
the commission system ; the warehouse and elevator systems ; coopera- 
tive marketing, and trade-promoting agencies. The sen-ice in pro- 
moting commerce of consular agents, foreign agents, trade museums, 
government departments of trade and commerce, trade associations, 
and export and import agencies, is fully considered. The laboratory 
facilities which Chicago offers in this field will be utilized to the 
largest extent practicable, specific attention being given to concrete 
marketing problems as illustrated in the work of local concerns. 
Not given in 1912-1913. 

Industrial Consolidation and Efficiency 

Wednesdays Professor Hotchkiss 

This course will aim to make a critical study of the economic 
causes of industrial consolidation. Attention will be given to various 
economies of production in large-scale industry, such as the better 
organization of plant and machinery, the more efficient utilization of 
men, the adaptation of the size of plant to produce the maximum 
efficiency, the utilization of by-products, the comparison of costs in 
different plants. Distributing and selling advantages such as the 
elimination of cross freight?, the saving of time in deliveries, the 
adaptation of product to particular markets, reduction of selling and 
advertising cost, and other advantages of like nature, will also be 
considered. Advantages of the sort thus enumerated will be set 
against additional cost entailed by large-scale production, such as 
enhanced legal and political expenditure, expenses of management and 
supervision. Inquiry will also be made as to how far the benefits of 
large-scale production are due to monopoly and how far consistent 
with the survival of competition. Finally, combinations will be con- 
sidered from the point of view of individual profits, from the point 
of view of efficiency in producing and distributing economic goods, 
and from the point of view T of their influence upon the political and 
social welfare of the community-. The material for the course will 



32 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

be confined to the specific information now available concerning the 
development and the productivity of industrial combinations. 

Law and Policy of Industrial Combinations Professor Hotchkiss 

This course will first trace the development of legal principles 
concerning monopoly and restraint of trade, giving attention to the 
application of common law principles in the United States prior to 
the enactment of so-called anti-trust laws. Consideration will then 
be given to the development of anti-trust legislation in the different 
states, to the judicial decisions under anti-trust laws, and to the in- 
dustrial effect of these laws. A thorough study will then be made of 
the Sherman Anti-Trust Law and of its interpretation and develop- 
ment by court decision. The legal status of combinations disinte- 
grated and reorganized under recent court decisions will be considered. 
The policy toward industrial combinations in this country will be 
compared and contrasted with the policy of other countries, notably 
Germany and England. Finally, an effort will be made to develop 
rational principles of legislation and control, and to embody these 
principles in the outlines of law and administrative machinery suitable 
to American conditions. Not given in 1912-1913. 



Insurance 

Elements of Life Insurance Dr. Brooks 

This course aims to give the student a general survey of the 
subject and to enable him to discriminate between kinds of policies. 
It also furnishes the preparation for further specialization in this 
field. The course will begin with an historical outline of the subject 
followed by discussion of fraternal, industrial and old-line insurance. 
The meaning of annuities, premiums, endowments and reserves, tables 
of mortality, compound interest, and the theory of probability will 
be explained in their application to elementary life insurance prob- 
lems. Critical analysis will be made of the provisions in different 
forms of policies. Medical selection, accumulation and distribution 
of surplus, different forms of organization, state supervision, will be 
given attention. This will be followed by a review of present life 
insurance conditions in the United States. The course will cover the 
subjects prescribed for examination for associate membership in the 
Actuarial Society of America and to the American Institute of 
Actuaries. Class exercises and discussions will involve an examination 
of policies, statements and reports of various companies. Students 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 33 

electing this course must have had at least the amount of algebra 
required for college entrance. Not given in 1912-1913. 

Fire Insurance and Engineering 

Consideration will be given to special fire hazards, especially in 
connection with combustible goods; to the fire-resisting qualities of 
different kinds of construction; to fire protection, public and private; 
to fire extinguishers; to the organization and efficiency of fire de- 
partments; the use of different makes of engines, pumps, and water 
supplies. Large use will be made of concrete insurance problems 
and attention will be given to the study and analysis of particular 
policies. Not given in IQ12-1913. 



Psychology 

Business Psychology Mondays Professor Scott 

This course will provide for a thorough and comprehensive study 
of the human and personal elements in business, emphasizing the 
established laws of psychology which have the most direct application 
in the business field. Effort will be made to analyze the psychological 
principles underlying efficient organization. Laws for increasing 
human efficiency will be studied. Attention will be given to the 
analysis and development of good will and principles involved in the 
relation of a business to its employes and to the public. Advertising 
and salesmanship will be studied as a single branch of business 
organization. Advertising as resting on fundamental principles of 
exchange and mutual service. Selling as influenced by tastes and 
mental characteristics of buyers. The psychological basis of practical 
advertising and selling policies. Throughout the course analysis will 
be made of the psychological reaction of mechanical and artistic ele- 
ments in advertising, and of the whole publicity departments of 
different establishments. Principles will be tested by application to 
actual business experience. 



Transportation 

Railroad Organization and Problems Professor Secrist 

This course is designed to afford a broad survey of the organiza- 
tion of a railroad and of its relations to shippers, the public at large, 



34 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

and the government. At the same time problems of special interest 
to those who plan to enter the railroad service will be given critical 
consideration. After a preliminary discussion reviewing the factors 
which determine the character of a railroad and thus influence the 
form of its organization, the course will describe the internal make-up 
of a railroad system and its principal departments. The external 
relations; the development of transportation systems and their rela- 
tion to markets; the position of Chicago as the great central market 
in its relation to transportation; the rights and liabilities of common 
carriers of goods and passengers at common law and under modern 
statutes, and traffic problems. Under the head of traffic an examina- 
tion will be made of divisions and classification of rates, rate agree- 
ments, rate wars and the like. 

The relations of the railroad to the state will include a survey of 
restrictive and regulative legislation, both state and national, in the 
past and in the present. The Interstate Commerce Act, as interpreted 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission and the courts, will be 
examined. Throughout the course there will be kept steadily in view 
the underlying principles of transportation problems, the sources from 
which they are drawn, and their practical application. Lectures by 
practical railroad men will be given from time to time on special 
topics, and pending transportation problems will illustrate the prin- 
ciples considered. Not given in 1912-1913. 

Railroad Law Mr. Kerr 

This course is adapted alike to the needs of business men and of 
railroad men. Particular attention is given to the law of common 
carriers, its economic foundation; duties of common carriers; the 
beginning, duration and termination of their extraordinary liability 
as insurers; duty to carry safely; exceptions; limitations of liability; 
transfer to connecting lines; bills of lading, their representations and 
conditions; claims, their origin, enforcement and collection; duty of 
shipper or consignee to pay a reasonable compensation; the carrier's 
means of enforcing same ; rights and duties of the railroad as a public 
service agency and of the shipper as a member of the public ; the duty 
of the railroad to carry for all persons on terms of equality and for 
reasonable charges; the foundation of this duty in the necessities of 
the public and of the public welfare; remedies at common law; unjust 
discriminations between individuals, localities and commodities; the 
meaning of the railroad problem ; early legislative experiences ; Gran- 
ger laws; the act to regulate commerce; pooling; competition and 
cooperation; long and short haul section; power of commission over 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 35 

rates; Sherman law and the railroad problem; rebates and illegal 
preferences; consolidations of connecting and competing lines; Elkins 
law; enlargement of the scope of the Commerce Act in 1906 and 
increase in the powers of the Interstate Commerce Commission; fur- 
ther legislation of 1910; procedure of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission; state commissions, including the Illinois Railroad and Ware- 
house Commission. 

Decisions of the courts and of commissions are placed in the 
hands of students and constitute the foundation of the course. Not 
given in 1912-1913. 

Railroad Rates 

A study of the principles and theory of rate-making, based upon 
decisions of the court, of the Interstate Commerce Commission and 
state commissions ; the application of principles in practice ; rate struc- 
tures as applied to industrial and transportation problems in the 
United States ; the organization, jurisdiction and operation of railroad 
freight associations; the organization of railway traffic departments; 
the basis of through rate adjustments in different parts of the coun- 
try; basing points and trade centers; Western, Official and Southern 
classifications and classification exceptions published by tariff com- 
mittees, associations and bureaus; class and commodity rates; differ- 
entials. The course is intended to give a practical working knowledge 
of actual rate conditions affecting the movements of traffic. The 
students will be expected to analyze and interpret freight tariffs and 
to apply the principles in determining rates between specific points. 
Not given in 1912-1913. 



Languages 

English I Tuesdays Dr. Smart 

This course is intended to meet the needs of students who are 
not fully prepared for the work of English II. It gives a rapid, 
systematic review of the fundamental elements of the language, and 
lays the foundation for a more advanced study of the principles of 
correct oral and written expression. In the first semester, a thorough 
review of the essential elements of English grammar is given. The 
work is made as non-technical and practical as possible. The work 
of the second semester consists of a review of punctuation and an 
introduction to the simpler principles of sentence structure. For all 
except those who have had similar training elsewhere the course should 
precede English II. (This course is not credited toward the diploma 
in Commerce.) 



36 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

English II Wednesdays Dr. Smart 

This course is a continuation of English I, but may be taken by 
anyone who has had at least two years of high school work in English, 
or the equivalent. The first semester and part of the second semester 
are devoted to the study of advanced sentence structure, paragraph- 
ing, and organization of material, supplemented by practice in the 
writing of themes. The purpose of this work is to train the student 
in ease, correctness, and effectiveness of expression. Without such 
preliminary training, satisfactory work in the more technical forms of 
business writing is impossible; with it, the student can readily adapt 
himself to the requirements of his particular line of work. In the 
latter part of the second semester, some of the more technical forms 
of business correspondence are discussed, and drill in writing them is 
given. 

Students may enter both of these courses for the entire year, or, 
with the approval of the instructor, for either semester. To secure 
the best results, however, the student should enter at the beginning 
of the year. 

Public Speaking 

The purpose of work in this subject will be to train students in 
clear, concise and forceful oral expression. Different forms of oral 
discourse, such as description, exposition, argumentation and debate, 
will be studied with the idea of developing the kind of expression 
adapted to the result to be attained. The aim will be to develop the 
work around subjects which are of practical interest and upon which 
business men might be asked to speak. Some practice will be given 
in extemporaneous speaking but throughout the course emphasis will 
be laid upon the importance of ideas as the basis of worthy oral 
utterance. Given only on sufficient registration and subject to ar- 
rangement to be made at the opening of the school year. 

Commercial Spanish Thursdays Mr. Van Schaick 

The growing importance of our commercial interests in countries 
where Spanish is spoken, due to our insular possessions and the rela- 
tions of the United States with the South American Republics, makes 
a knowledge of Spanish indispensable to many lines of business activ- 
ity. The work in Spanish will begin with a thorough training in 
pronunciation and conversation. Appropriate stress will be laid on 
the technical vocabulary of trade, and on Spanish forms of commercial 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 37 

correspondence. Thorough drill in grammar and in the use of correct 
and idiomatic expression will be an important feature of the work. 

Commercial French Tuesdays Mr. Van Schaick 

The fact that French is the official language of many European 
countries and is used in many other parts of the world where our 
foreign commerce is assuming increasing importance makes a knowl- 
edge of French indispensable in many branches of foreign trade. The 
main feature of the work in French will be a thorough drill in 
French grammar and idioms. The course is intended for those who 
desire a practical knowledge of modern French for business purposes. 

Commercial German (Hours to be arranged.) 

The unparalleled expansion, during the last half century, of 
German commerce and its entry into all the markets of the world, 
make a knowledge of the German language a condition of successful 
competition in many lines of foreign trade. The work in German 
will be so arranged that fluency in the correct use of the spoken 
language may be supplemented by training in written correspondence 
involving a knowledge of German business forms and usages. To 
this end frequent exercises in conversation and in grammatical forms 
will be accompanied by practice and criticism in commercial corre- 
spondence. Given only on sufficient registration. 



General Announcements 

Special Lectures 

Regular instruction in the several courses provides for frequent 
lectures by men who, from their experience are in a position to speak 
authoritatively upon the subjects under discussion. In addition to 
this, men prominent in the business and professional life of the com- 
munity from time to time give general lectures to all the students 
of the School. 

Library Facilities 

The generosity of certain Chicago business men has enabled the 
School to establish in the Northwestern University Building, Chicago, 
a library containing all the more important texts and works of refer- 
ence on business subjects. The John Crerar Library and the Public 
Library of Chicago, to which students of the School of Commerce 
have access, are both located within five minutes' walk of the North- 
western University Building. 



38 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



Bureau of Appointments 

The School of Commerce does not undertake to assure students 
of positions either during or at the end of their course of study. 
There has been opened, however, a Bureau of Appointments at the 
School through which the attention of students is brought to the 
demands of the business community. The efficacy of efforts in behalf 
of students will depend to a very large extent upon their own co- 
operation. Information which may come to any student concerning 
positions to be filled should be brought promptly to the attention of 
the Bureau, together with such details as can be secured. Business 
houses have frequently expressed a desire to secure graduates of the 
School. Registration for employment should be made at the office. 

Prizes 

the joseph schaffner prize 
A prize of one hundred dollars, the gift of Mr. Joseph Schafmer, 
is awarded annually to that evening student in the School of Com- 
merce who upon graduation has made the best record during a mini- 
mum of two years' work. 

THE ILLINOIS SOCIETY OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS PRIZE 

A prize of one hundred dollars was established in June, 1909, by 
the Illinois Society of Certified Public Accountants, for the purpose 
of stimulating interest in those subjects which are indispensable to 
students intending to enter the profession of accountancy. It is 
awarded annually to that evening student in the School of Commerce 
who makes the best record for the year in the two courses of Inter- 
mediate Accounting and Commercial Law (either I or II). 

A student winning the Joseph Schaffner prize is not eligible for 
the Illinois Society of Certified Accountants Prize in the same year. 

Library Scholarships 

Two Library Scholarships of seventy-five dollars each are open 
to students in the School. They will be awarded, if possible, to stu- 
dents who have already been registereed in the School, on the basis of 
their previous work and their ability to undertake the limited amount 
of work required. Applications must be in before the first of August. 

Degree of Certified Public Accountant 

By act of the General Assembly passed May 15, 1903, provision 
is made for a state examination for the degree of Certified Public 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 39 

Accountant. For many years the Illinois Society of Certified Public 
Accountants contemplated founding a school in which should be 
given the accounting work necessary to prepare for this degree. One 
of the results of commercial development during the last generation 
has been the growth in importance of the accounting profession. A 
knowledge of accountancy is becoming almost indispensable to the 
successful conduct of every business. Business efficiency demands, 
moreover, that the professional accountant shall be a man of broad 
and fundamental training and of recognized professional standing, 
parallel to that of the lawyer and the physician. The close con- 
nection of the School of Commerce with the leading men of the 
profession enables it to set a high standard of professional training. 

Student Social Organizations 

During the past four years the students of the School of Com- 
merce, in a body known as the Student Organization, have been 
active not only in the promotion of fellowship among themselves, but 
also in the development of interest and a spirit of loyal cooperation 
in the student enterprises of the University as a whole. In addition 
to various smokers and entertainments, the annual banquet given just 
previous to the close of school has proved an important and interest- 
ing feature of the year's activities. All students are urged to par- 
ticipate as far as possible in the social life of the School. 

The School of Commerce Debating Club 

This society was organized by the students in the School of Com- 
merce in the fall of 191 1. Bi-weekly meetings have been held regu- 
larly during the year but it is intended that beginning with next year 
meetings will be held weekly. The society affords a good opportunity 
for the students in the School to improve themselves in the art of 
public speaking. The intention is to meet outside clubs in debate at 
least twice during the year. 

Tuition 

For 5 or more courses. .$100 First semester, $55 ; second semester, $45 

For 4 courses 85 First semester, 45 ; second semester, 40 

For 3 courses 75 First semester, 40; second semester, 35 

For 2 courses 60 First semester, 35 ; second semester, 25 

For 1 course 45 First semester, 25 ; second semester, 20 



40 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



Fees 

Lecture Note Fees. A fee sufficient to cover the cost of prepar- 
ing and manifolding notes is entered with the tuition bill at the 
beginning of each semester. This fee will not exceed $5.00 a semes- 
ter. The substance of many of the courses offered in the School of 
Commerce, notably Accounting, has been prepared in such a way as 
to take the place of textbooks. In all courses in which a regular 
textbook is used the notes distributed will be supplementary thereto 
and the fee will be nominal. 

Matriculation and Diploma Fees. A matriculation fee of $5.00 
is charged all students who qualify for the diploma, and is payable 
at the beginning of their last year. The diploma fee of $10.00 is 
payable at the close of the final year, prior to Commencement. 

Refunds 

No tuition is refunded by Northwestern University except 
upon certification by physician that serious illness has compelled the 
student to withdraw permanently from the School. Credit on tuition 
cannot be extended from one year to the next. 

Hours for Consultation and Registration 

The office of the School of Commerce, in Room 412, North- 
western University Building, at the corner of Lake and Dearborn 
Streets, Chicago, will be open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. ; during the 
school year, 9 A. M. to 7 p. m., daily; Saturdays from 9 to 1. Be- 
tween September 1 and November 1 the office will be open on Satur- 
day from 9 to 5. Consultation at other hours will be arranged upon 
request. 

Address all correspondence to Northwestern University 
School of Commerce, Lake and Dearborn Streets, Chicago. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 41 



List of Students who have Received the Diploma in 

Commerce 

1910-1911 

Carl August Gaensslen Frederick Parks Mozingo 

Joseph Henry Gilby Walter Andrew Mueller 

Joseph Sebastian Kelly Keichiro Nakagami 

David Himmelblau 

1911-1912 

Lewis Ethelbert Ashman George Joseph Schkurovich 

Nels Frye Orlo Dean Smith 

William Herbert Maddock Jacob Martin Ullman 

Edward John McBrady Fred Norman Vanderwalker 
Walter Holton Price 

Prizes and Honors 

1911-1912 

The Joseph Schaffner Prize, for the highest scholarship in three 
or more courses: 

Frederick Bernard Andrews. 

The Illinois Society of Certified Public Accountants Prize: 
Frederick Bernard Andrews. 

The following students, registered for three or more courses, 
received honorable mention: 

Alfred Henry Oscar Erickson Walter Holton Price 

Arthur Lovett Jeffery Orlo Dean Smith 

Edward Walter Koehler Fred Norman Vanderwalker 



Students Registered in the School of Commerce for 
the Year 1911-1912 

Absalonsen, Alf, Bookkeeper, Savings Department, State Bank of Chicago 

Acree, William R., Bookkeeper, Rubel Loose Leaf Mfg. Company. 

Adams, Elmer N., Chief Operator, Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Agnew, Edward W., Cashier, Mills Novelty Company. 

Ahlberg, Thorsten J., Collector, William Steele. 

Albert, Lawrence J., Clerk, Marshall Field & Co., (wholesale). 

Allen, Homer F., Bookkeeper, Carter White Lead Company. 

Andersen, Walter H., Clerk, Booth Fisheries Company. 

Anderson, Alfred W., Bookkeeper, Lyon & Healy. 

Anderson, Arthur, Bookkeeper, Joyce-Watkins Company. 

Anderson, Elmer T., Bryant & Greenwood. 

Anderson, Oscar A., Bookkeeper, Eldredge Coal Company. 

Andrews, Frederick B., Cashier, Haskins & Sells. 

Andrews, Roger W., Factory Superintendent, Northern Equipment Company. 

Arnold, William F., Teller, First National Bank. 

Ashman, Lewis E., Accountant, Ernst & Ernst. 

Backus, Roy E., 658 W. Sixty-first PI. 

Baddeley, Oscar O., Claim Clerk, Carson Pirie Scott & Company. 

Balaty, Vincent, Bookkeeper, Hart, Schaffner & Marx. 

Baldwin, Frank L., Accountant, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Baldwin, Robert B., Jr., Clerk, Swift & Company. 

Bardi, Karl E., Cashier, National Waterproof Film Company. 

Barnes, Walter C, Clerk, Lord & Thomas Advertising Company. 

Baron, Maurice H., Clerk, City Comptroller's Office. 

Bartells, Henry H., Stenographer, Joseph T. Ryerson & Son. 

Bauer, Albert W., Statistical Department, Murphy Varnish Company. 

Beck, Anton T., Clerk, Fidelity Phoenix Life Insurance Company. 

Beckenstein, William, Bank Teller, West Side Trust & Savings Bank. 

Beech, George A., Clerk, Heywood Bros. & Wakefield Company. 

Beeson, William B., Salesman, W. S. Knight & Co. 

Bell, John W., Auditor, Young Men's Christian Association. 

Bender, William H., Comptroller, Chicago Automobile Club. 

Benson, Miss Edna T., Bookkeeper, C. A. Chapman, Inc. 

Benson, N. Bernard, 4343 Monroe St. 

Bernatz, George, Bookkeeper, Marshall Fuel Company. 

Bernstein, Mitchell L., Salesman, United Sales Corporation. 

Berti, Titus N., 207 E. Chestnut Street. 

Billie, Frank J., Credit Dept., International Harvester Company of America. 

Birmingham, Bruce L., Railway Mail Clerk, United States Government. 

Blaha, Edward W., Catalog Compiler, Beardslee Chandelier Mfg. Company. 

Block, Fred F., Junior Member Block-Naktin, Real Estate. 

Boecklen, John P., Partner, Boecklen Brothers. 

Boehm, George F., Head Bookkeeper, Dixon-Hanson-Bellows Company. 

Boettcher, Emil, Clerk, Paepcke-Leicht Lumber Company. 

Bonk, Joseph P., Jr., Bookkeeper, Spaulding & Merrick. 

Boughton, Robert L., Cashier, Pitkin & Brooks. 

Bourke, Philip L., Record Clerk, Western Foundry Company. 

Bowmar, Stanley, Manager, The Public. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 43 



Brandt, Ferdinand M., Stenographer, Northern Trust Safe Deposit Company. 

Brandt, James F., Clerk, Swift & Company. 

Bready, John W., Office Clerk, Marshall Field & Company. 

Bretall, Walter H., Salesman and Traffic Manager, Paramount Knitting Co. 

Bretl, Frank J., Bookkeeper, Ritter Dental Supply House. 

Briggs, Joseph, Clerk, H. M. Byllesby & Co. 

Bristol, James T., Order Clerk, S. R. Chapin & Co. 

Brown, Harry W., Electrical Dept., Chicago Telephone Company. 

Brown, John B., Salesman, Allis-Chalmers Company. 

Brown, Robert M., A. B. Leach & Company. 

Brown, Samuel I., 6351 Yale Avenue. 

Buck, George L., Silver, Burdett & Company. 

Buckberg, Walter T., Floor Superintendent, Butler Brothers. 

Bugler, Louis J., Stenographer, 416 Fisher Building. 

Bullock, Harry L., Bookkeeper, Morris & Company. 

Bumbarger, Miss Hattie, Bookkeeper, The Knollin Sheep Company. 

Burkland, Swan G., Bookkeeper, Chicago Telephone Co. 

Buten, Erwin Albert, Correspondent, Atlas Portland Cement Company. 

Cadden, John L., Clerk, Wells Fargo Express Company. 

Callender, Alexander B., Civil Engineer, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. 

Carey, Patrick S., Auditor, Paris Fashion Cloak Company. 

Carlson, Miss Vera, Stenographer, Otis Elevator Company. 

Casavaw, Miss Josephine M., Instructor, Chicago Public Schools. 

Casper, George H., Cashier, American Can Company. 

Chindblom, David P., Sec'y to Traffic Director, Chicago Ass'n of Commerce. 

Chorlette, Louis W., Ledger Clerk, Sprague, Warner & Company. 

Christophel, Carl C, Advertising Dept., Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. 

Civis, James A., Department Manager, Miller, Hall & Son. 

Clafford, Herbert J., Accountant, The Royal Tailors. 

Clarke, Miss Rosamond A., Audit Clerk, K. J. Mearns. 

Cleary, Gerald V., Real Estate, Cremin & O'Connor. 

Cliff, Arthur F., 4721 N. Lincoln Street. 

Clifford, Stephen A., Member, S. Clifford & Co., Real Estate. 

Cohen, Nathan, Bookkeeper, Louis Meyer & Son. 

Cohn, Frank, Bookkeeper, 520 Federal Street. 

Coleman, Rollin M., Union Trust Company. 

Colberg, James A., Traveling Auditor, Booth Fisheries Company. 

Conklin, Frederick B., Chief Cost Clerk, E. Goldman & Company. 

Connolly, Arthur J., Bookkeeper, Commonwealth-Edison Company. 

Cooper,. Manuel, Bookkeeper, Charles Pope. 

Corlett, George V., Cashier, H. H. Kohlsaat & Co (wholesale). 

Corrigan, John E., Auditing Clerk, Marshall Field & Company (retail). 

Creed, Kenneth G., Clerk, Griffin Wheel Company. 

Crews, Joseph H., Public Accountant, Kenneth S. Smith & Co. 

Cronk, Paul H., Bookkeeper and Cost Clerk, Free Sewing Machine Company. 

Cushman, Robert E., Credit Department, Old Colony Trust & Savings Bank. 

Dale, David, Jr., Cashier, Spencer Trask & Co., Bankers. 
Daly, Elwood C, Stenographer, Spencer Kellogg & Sons. 
Davis, Fred, Bookkeeper, American Book Company. 
Davison, John E., Wilson Avenue, Y. M. C. A. 
Dedaker, Robert N., Clerk, Paepcke-Leicht Lumber Company. 



44 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSIT 



Deiss, Harry B., Bookkeeper, Tarrant Foundry Company. 

Denig, Russell F., Clerk, Armour & Co. 

Denton, Miss M. Estelle, Bookkeeper, M. Phillipsborn Company. 

DeWard, Peter C, Cashier, Dixon-Hanson-Bellows Company. 

Dick, Frederick C, Stenographer, S. E. Loveless Advertising Service. 

Dittmer, Anthony J., Bookkeeper, John Sexton & Company. 

Dixon, Jules P., Accountant, Goodrich Transit Company. 

Dobbs, Frank W., Chief Clerk to Storekeeper, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 

Railway. 
Dobin, Henry A., Bookkeeper, Dixon-Hanson-Bellows Company. 
Dombrow, Rudolph C, Cashier, Western Foundry Company. 
Donars, Frank A., Bookkeeper, Bryan-Marsh Company. 
Dorman, Charles A., Clerk, Fidelity-Phoenix Insurance Company. 
Doty, George M., Clerk, Illinois Trust & Savings Bank. 
Downer, John F., Cashier, Alfred L. Baker Company, Stocks and Bonds. 
Duers, John Elmer, Bookkeeper, United States Brewing Company of Chicago. 
Dvorak, Theophilus F., 2342 Millard Avenue. 
Dwinell, Merrill, 1935 Sherman Avenue, Evanston. 

East, Arthur H., Stores Accounting, Chicago Railway Company. 

Eisinger, Miss Alma C, 1028 Oakdale Avenue. 

Ellickson, Lester R., Clerk, Pullman Company. 

Erickson, A. H. O., Clerk, Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Hospital. 

Erickson, V. M., Bookkeeper, A. G. Spaulding & Bros. 

Esrig, Morris, Millinery Department, Chicago Mercantile Company. 

Evans, W. M., 18 10 W. 23 d Street. 

Evers, F. R., Private Secretary, North Shore Electric Company. 

Faber, G. S., Electrical Engineer, Chicago Railways Company. 

Farwell, E. C, Clerk, Western Electric Company. 

Fathschild, C. W., Assistant Bookkeeper, Wolf, Sayer & Heller. 

Fenlon, W. J., Credit Correspondent, Burlington Watch Company. 

Field, A. M., Clerk, Wabash Railroad. 

Finholt, O. A., Bookkeeper, John Proco & Company. 

Fitzgerald, C. P., Cashier, By-Products Coke Corporation. 

Fleming, T. J., Clerk, National Biscuit Company. 

Flershem, W. B., Certified Public Accountant, Audit Company of New York. 

Flynn, J. M., Clerk, Marshall Field & Company (retail). 

Foe, G. J., Bookkeeper, Bowman Dairy Company. 

Foley, E. I., Stenographer, New York Central Lines. 

Forsen, H. B., Piano Tuner, Fuehr & Stemmer Piano Company. 

Forshee, Charles A., Secretary, Western Life Indemnity Company. 

Foster, H. S., Clerk, The Millers' Products Company. 

Frank, E. G., Bookkeeper, Kennicott Brothers Company. 

Frechette, C. J., General Bookkeeper, Miehle Printing Press and Mfg. Co. 

Friberg, Elmer, Bookkeeper, Chicago Belting Company. 

Friedlund, F. O., Clerk, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Friedman, I. S., Bookkeeper, The Franklin Company. 

Frost, Sidney J., Collections, Chicago & Eastern Indiana Railroad. 

Frye, Nels, Bookkeeper, Butler Brothers. 

Furse, J. R., Clerk, Western Electric Company. 

Gaensslen, Carl A., Draftsman, Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge Company. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 45 

Gallo, E. T., Foreign Exchange Clerk, A. Romano, Banker. 

Gaussin, Miss Mame, Bookkeeper, Chicago Fuel Company. 

Geary, W. T., Insurance, 105 N. Clark Street. 

Gerlach, Charles, Clerk, Chicago Mill and Lumber Company. 

Germain, Silas E., Jr., Sales Department, Eagle Tanning Works. 

Germer, Miss A. E., Stenographer, O. W. Richardson & Co. 

Gibbons, T. P., Office Salesman, Cudahy Packing Company. 

Giffey, Max, Mechanical Engineer, Link Belt Company. 

Ginski, P. F., F. Westerman & Co. 

Glass, Alvin M., Bookkeeper, Jerrems, Inc. 

Gleason, Miss Anna, Private Secretary, J. L. Kesner. 

Glessner, A. B.', Clerk, Excelsior Steel Furnace Company. 

Goetz, Emil, Clerk, United States Government. 

Goheen, C. M., Junior Accountant, Arthur Young & Company. 

Goodell, E. D., Accountant, Morris & Company. 

Goodykoontz, Wilmer, Electrical Engineer, Commonwealth-Edison Company. 

Gordon, Henry J., Clerk, Rock Island Railroad. 

Graffis, W. H., Jr., Advertising, Telephony Publishing Company. 

Grawoig, Herman, Bookkeeper, Robert Stevenson & Company. 

Green, Miss Anna E., Stenographer, Nathan F. Leopold. 

Green, R. H. A., Auditor, Arthur Young & Company. 

Greenwood, A. S., 4334 Kenmore Ave. 

Greenwood, R. C, 4334 Kenmore Ave. 

Gregory, G. D., Chief Clerk, American Bridge Company. 

Grew, Edward W., Attorney, Illinois Central Railroad. 

Griffith, Lewellyn, Accountant, Illinois Central Railroad. 

Grobe, H. F., Stenographer, H. M. Byllesby & Co. 

Gruenhut, Miss Flora, Bookkeeper, Denney & Company. 

Grussinger, Miss A. M., Bookkeeper, Harding Brothers. 

Gullans, John, Accountant, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. 

Gullikson, H. D., Clerk, Durand Kasper Company. 

Gunther, S. L., Bookkeeper, Spiegel, May, Stern & Co. 

Guthman, R. E., Lakota Hotel. 

Haferkamp, E. W., Cashier, Miehle Printing Press & Mfg. Company. 

Hake, Gustav, Receiving Teller, Union Trust Company. 

Hale, Sanborn, Clerk, W. D. Allen Manufacturing Company. 

Hall, G. K., Bond Cashier, Shapker & Company. 

Hamilton, H. R., Jr., Assistant to Superintendent, Nubian Paint & Varnish Co. 

Harara, A. H., Bookkeeper, J. F. Rowley Company. 

Hannagan, P. S., Statistican, Illinois Central Railroad. 

Hanson, A. M., Clerk, Chicago & Northwestern Railway. 

Harber, W. E., Office Man, P. W. Coppersmith & Co. 

Hargrave, A. F., Head Bookkeeper, United States Crushed Stone Company. 

Hargrave, C. M., Cost Clerk, Crane Company. 

Harnblom, W. C, Correspondent, J. W. Butler Paper Company. 

Harrington, William J., Clerk, McGuire & Orr, Real Estate. 

Hartwig, H. A., Bookkeeper, A. C. McCIurg & Co. 

Hatting, H. W., Bookkeeper, Pond's Bitters Company. 

Hauber, Frank J., Bookkeeper, W. M. Hoyt Company. 

Hausser, A. H. W., Dispatcher, Postoffice, United States Government 

Hayner, Silas A., Banking, Colonial Trust & Savings Bank. 

Helms, F. W., Bookkeeper, Shea, Smith & Company. 



46 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



Hennessy, Mark M, Stenographer, Mueller & Young Grain Company. 

Hiller, Joseph, Clerk, Atlantic Seaboard Despatch. 

Hiller, W. N., Clerk, Washington Tailoring Company. 

Hillier, E. W., Bookkeeper, James O. Heyworth. 

Hirata, Iwao, Takito, Ogawa & Company. 

Hodges, Hayden, Clerk, American Radiator Company. 

Hoerich, E. A., Clerk, John P. Marsh Company. 

Hoffman, A. B., Bookkeeper and Cashier, M. A. Staley Company. 

Hoffman, Mark, Spiegel, May, Stern & Co. 

Hoffman, Paul, Clerk, Julius Kessler & Company. 

Hohn, O. F., Accountant, 1714 Granville Avenue. 

Hornbeck, J. S., Clerk, Quaker Oats Company. 

Horney, G. E,. Accountant, Ernest Reckitt & Company. 

Hossack, A. W., Stenographer, International Harvester Company. 

Hough, N. G., Assistant to Manager, Gypsum Fireproofing Company. 

Howe, W. P., Credit Department, Chicago Varnish Company. 

Hoxie, D. W., Cost Clerk, Miller, Hall & Son. 

Hoyt, E. R., Clerk, Butler Brothers. 

Hoxworth, C. C, Cashier, Goodman Manufacturing Company. 

Hurley, John C, Clerk, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Immel, Paul P., Bookkeeper, Chicago Mill and Lumber Company. 
Israelstam, M., Salesman, Marcus Ruben. 

Janke, W. C, Clerk, McNeil & Higgins Company. 

Jansen, Charles H., Bookkeeper, Hotel Windermere. 

Jeffery, A. L., Cashier, U. S. Metal and Manufacturing Company. 

Jenkins, G. S., Chief Clerk Pay Check Bureau, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 

Paul Railway. 
Jensen, J. A., Salesman, John B. Washburne & Co. 
Jensen, Z. L., Accountant, Walton, Joplin, Langer & Co. 
Jernberg, C. L., Bank Teller, West Side Trust and Savings Bank. 
Johnson, A. E., Order Clerk, Garlock Packing Company. 
Johnson, E. H., Accountant, Ernest Reckitt & Co. 

Johnson, J. F., General Clerk, Wagner & Pullman Palace Car Company. 
Johnson, R. W., Clerk, Michigan Central Railroad. 
Jones, R. G., Credits, Continental & Commercial National Bank. 
Juchhoff, Frederick, Teacher, J. Sterling Morton High School. 

Kaeding, O. P., Bookkeeper, Guthmann, Carpenter & Telling. - 

Kaplan, M. P., 1916 W. Indiana St. 

Kearns, J. J., Stenographer, Chicago Railways Company. 

Kehr, C. M., Junior Accountant, E. S. Goodloe, New York City. 

Kelly, M. J., Stenographer, U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 

Kenyon, Edward, Clerk, Critchell, Miller, Whitney & Barbour. 

Kerr, C. C, Manufacturer, Tents and Awnings. 

King, W. C, Sales Manager, Virginia & Rainy Lake Company. 

Kinney, A. W., Bookkeeper, Chicago Mill and Lumber Company. 

Klemmer, S. A., Bookkeeper, Fidelity-Phoenix Fire Insurance Company. 

Klewer, John L., Assistant Sales Manager, Walter Baker Company. 

Kline, E. W., Bookkeeper, Imperial Iron & Steel Company. 

Kobylanski, W. F., Clerk, North West State Bank. 

Koehler, E. W., Accountant, Ernst & Ernst. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 47 



Kolkow, G. J., Stenographer, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 

Krah, C. A., Sales Department, Western Electric Company. 

Kreidler, M. L., Stenographer, School of Commerce. 

Kresl, Carl, Jr., Clerk, American State Bank. 

Krumwiede, T. H., 2122 Sherman Ave., Evanston. 

Kuhn, J. P., Ledgerman, National Biscuit Company. 

Kuntz, P. E., Buyer, Felt & Tarrant Mfg. Co. 

Kryzinski, A. J., Toll Traffic, Chicago Telephone Company. 

LaDue, H. D., Bookkeeper, Henry Newgard & Company. 

Langlund, A. A., Clerk,. Chicago Telephone Company. 

Larsen, H. W., Cashier, Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Larsen, W. T., Bookkeeper, Fort Dearborn National Bank. 

Larson, L. A., Draftsman, Marine Iron Works. 

Latus, W. H., Accountant, Booth Fisheries Company. 

Leake, D. E., Teller, Illinois Trust and Savings Bank. 

Lechler, E. F., E. Lechler, Importer and Jobber of Jewelry. 

Lee, J. E., Clerk, Chicago & Northwestern Railway. 

Levine, Ephraim, Accountant, Commonwealth Edison Company. 

Lew, F. M., Public Accountant, Collins E. Gauntlett. 

Liebling, J. D., Linotype Operator, Liebling Publishing Company. 

Linblade, R. H., Ledger Clerk, A. C. McClurg & Co. 

Lind, P. A., Chief Clerk, Garlock Packing Company. 

Lindeen, R. E., Clerk, Pullman Company. 

Lippmann, A. F., 1056 Webster Ave. 

Lobanoff, Paul E., Inspector, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Lundblad, B. E., Accountant, Baker Vawter Company. 

Lutin, C. I., 716 Clark Street. 

Lynch, W. R., Accountant, Thomas Cusack Company. 

McBrady, E. J., Bookkeeper, Morris & Company. 

McCandless, William, Clerk, Armour & Company. 

McCaughey, M. J., Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company. 

McConnell, C. F., Buyer, Sears, Roebuck & Company. 

McCready, H. A., Bookkeeper, University of Chicago. 

McDonough, F. T., Clerk, Peoples Gas Light & Coke Company. 

McGibbon, E. E., Bookkeeper, Chicago Telephone Company. 

McGinnis, E. A., Stenographer, Kelly-Atkinson Construction Company. 

McGregor, James A., Salesman, Armour & Company. 

McGuinn, E. B., Accountant, 4251 Jackson Blvd. 

McKay, M. E., Bookkeeper, National City Bank. 

McKinley, J. M., Jr., Bookkeeper, Swift & Company. 

McLachlan, E. J., Clerk, Fairbanks, Morse & Co. 

McLeish, A. L., Cashier, Carson Pirie Scott & Co. 

Maddock, W. H., 7226 Harvard Ave. 

Maechler, Fred, Clerk, Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. 

Maechler, R. R., Bookkeeper, Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. 

Mally, G. W., Clerk, H. P. Magill & Co. 

Maloney, F. L., Bookkeeper, G. K. Hammond Company. 

Manley, F. H., Clerk, H. M. Byllesby & Co. 

Mann, G. E., Accountant, Ernst & Ernst. 

Mansur, C. L, Miehle Printing Press & Mfg. Co. 

Martin, R. L., Assistant Cashier, Selz-Schwab Company. 



48 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



Mathias, L. D., 6646 Kimbark Ave. 

Matthisen, A. F., Illinois Central Railroad. 

Maul, W. H., Division Man, Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad. 

Mays, J. F., Bookkeeper, Wm. D. Elmstrom Coal Company. 

Merker, A. J., Clerk, Swift & Company. 

Merrill, F. E., Receiving Teller, Northern Trust Company. 

Mertes, J. J., Accountant, American Steel Foundries. 

Meyn, H. J., Clerk, Scully Steel & Iron Company. 

Meynen, Carl, Ledgerman, Sears, Roebuck & Co. 

Mickey, R. H., Clerk, Jesse Binga, Banker. 

Miller, F. M., Clerk, Edgar Allen American Manganese Steel Company. 

Miller, R. A., 634 E. 44th St. 

Mills, E. S., Harvey, Illinois. 

Mitchell, W. G., Accountant, Arthur Young & Co. 

Modica, Ralph G., Accountant, Ernest Reckitt & Co. 

Moller, W. C, Bookkeeper, Balch Publishing Company. 

Monson, Marshall B., 4731 Calumet Ave. 

Moore, J. J., Bookkeeper, Morris & Company. 

Morrell, J. W., Clerk, Corn Exchange National Bank. 

Moulding, R. C., Salesman, Marshall Field & Company. 

Mueller, Richard, Assistant Receiver, Union Trust Company. 

Neill, W. M., Clerk, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 

Neiman, R. R., Bookkeeper, Cohn Brothers Cigar Co. 

Nelson, G. W., Assistant Chief Clerk, Accounting Department, Chicago & 

North-Western Railroad. 
Nelson, N. G., Clerk, Western Union Telegraph Company. 
Newton, F. A., Clerk, H. M. Byllesby & Co. 
Neyendorf, A. H., Credit Man, Henry Burhop, Jr. 
Niemack, H. A., Credit Man, Hans & Schlan. 
Nieman, W. C, Bookkeeper, Otto C. Owen. 
Niquette, C. A., Bookkeeper, New World Life Insurance Co. 
Nolan, J. J., Clerk, Pullman Company. 

Norman, C. R., Clerk, Marshall Field & Company (wholesale). 
Noyes, G. F., Sales Department, Chicago Varnish Company. 

O'Connell, H. P., Clerk, Chicago Railways Co. 

Ogilvie, A. W. T., General Auditor, M. Phillipsborn & Co. 

Ohlin, J. A., Cashier, Chicago Nipple Mfg. Co. 

Ohnesorge, H. B., Clerk, First National Bank. 

Olsen, Arthur, Auditing Department, Chicago Daily News. 

Olson, C. J., Clerk, Rogers Brown & Co. 

Olson, D. G., Salesman, Wm. Bianchio Company. 

O'Malley, R. F., Clerk, McCrumm-Howell Company. 

Organ, P. J., Clerk, International Harvester Co. 

Palmer, E. O., Accountant, 911 La Salle Ave. 

Paluszek, Adam, Advertising Manager, Polish National Daily. 

Papavasiliou, B. C, Importer, 4441 S. Halsted Street. 

Pape, O. R., Bookkeeper, 1614 Lawndale Ave. 

Parkin, A. W., Cashier, Kohler Brothers. 

Pascoe, R. A., 7018 Eggleston Ave. 

Pearson, Albin, Clerk, Big Creek Colliery Co. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 49 



Perrill, A. W., Trader, Carter, Shimmin & Douglass. 

Peters, P. H., 4335 Lake Ave. 

Peters, W. L., 4335 Lake Ave. 

Peterson, Carl L., Bookkeeper and Cashier, Cumner Jones & Co., Inc. 

Peterson, F. J., Timekeeper, Armour & Company. 

Peterson, J. G., Bookkeeper, Chicago Mill & Lumber Company. 

Petrie, David, Assistant Manager Notion Department, Butler Brothers. 

Pfluegner, G. C, Mortgage Loan Solicitor, S. W. Straus & Company. 

Polzin, E. F., Stenographer, Link Belt Company. 

Portley, D. J., Accountant, Audit Company of Illinois. 

Potter, Miss E. M., Bookkeeper and Stenographer, Diamond Whip Company. 

Potter, M. H., Assistant Bookkeeper, Russell, Brewster & Co. 

Potter, U. G., Teacher, City High School. 

Price, C. V., Salesman, Geo. H. Burr & Co. 

Price, J. J., Bookkeeper, Friedman Mfg. Co. 

Price, W. H., Bookkeeper, W. P. Dunn Company. 

Price, W. M., Bookkeeper-Cashier, Price & Teeple Piano Co. 

Protheroe, W. S., Bookkeeper, H. M. Byllesby & Co. 

Randall, T. B., Clerk, Frank Isenborger, Harvey, 111. 

Randall, W. H., Salesman, Shaw- Walker Systems. 

Rasmussen, G. R., Clerk, Chicago & North- Western Ry. 

Raymond, P. W., Bookkeeper, Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Ry. 

Redenbaugh, M. M., Bookkeeper, Chicago Mill & Lumber Co. 

Reed, J. L., Bookkeeper, Dolese Brothers Co. 

Rees, Alfred A., Evening Manager, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Reichert, A. C, Cashier and Bookkeeper, John Howard McCortney. 

Reidenbach, G. F., Stenographer, Butler Brothers. 

Reyher, R. E., Salesman, 2912 Evanston Ave. 

Rich, Irwin, Salesman, S. W. Straus & Co. 

Richey, V. N., Chief Order Clerk, Universal Portland Cement Co. 

Richsteig, R. J., Bookkeeper, A. Stein & Company. 

Ridenour, J. S., Lord & Thomas. 

Riedmayer, A. J., Clerk, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. 

Rigeman, A. H., Accountant, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Rivett, C. F., Clerk, Western Union Telegraph Co. 

Rixon, Harry, Clerk, Quaker Oats Company. 

Roberts, F. E., Jr., Head Bookkeeper, Sears, Roebuck & Company. 

Rodger, A. H., Clerk, Arthur Young & Co. 

Roth, Maurice, Stenographer and Bookkeeper, Nelson, Thomasson & Company. 

Rothbord, B. E., Clerk, Bureau of Water, City of Chicago. 

Ruckert, A. J., Bookkeeper, Morris & Company. 

Ruth, Chester, Salesman, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Sail, C. O., Clerk, Wm. D. Gibson Company. 

Salmonovitz, Leo, Bookkeeper, A. G. Spaulding & Bros. 

Sandberg, H. R., Bookkeeper, Chicago City Bank. 

Saner, B. M., Clerk, Comptroller's Dept., City of Chicago. 

Sauerman, J. A., Salesman, Sauerman Brothers. 

Scharmer, Miss Lillian, Stenographer, Insurance Exchange Building. 

Schkurovich, G. J., Auditor, Hillman's. 

Schroeder, W. H., Clerk, Western Electric Company. 

Schuber, A. R., Clerk, Chicago Mill & Lumber Co. 

Schulz, E. R., Clerk, International Harvester Co. 



50 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



Seaverns, L. C, Clerk, Armour & Company. 

Seipp, F. C, 7104 Jeffery Ave. 

Semmelmeyer, Miss Madeline, Teacher, Chicago Board of Education. 

Sexton, F. W., Stenographer, Audit Company of Illinois. 

Seymour, Darwin, Teller, Metropolitan Trust & Savings Bank. 

Shine, J. J., Clerk, Empire Car Company. 

Sievers, W. E., General Office Work, Beardslee Chandelier Mfg. Co. 

Silverman, M. B., Sales & Advertising, Chicago Ferrotype Company. 

Sinclair, J. D., Superintendent, Patent Vulcanite Roofing Company. 

Sisson, Miss B. E., Bookkeeper, John Magnus & Company. 

Skarpinski, A. A., Clerk, Chicago Mill & Lumber Co. 

Skubic, E. P., Stock Maintenance, Western Electric Company. 

Smith, A. G., Correspondent, Montgomery Ward & Company. 

Smith, J. V., Bookkeeper, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Smith, O. D., Rock Island, 111. 

Solon, E. J., Bookkeeper, Interstate Amusement Company. 

Solon, Leo, Clerk, Public Works, City of Chicago. 

Spencer, G. C, Watch Electrician, Commonwealth Edison Company. 

Speyer, John, Bookkeeper, Morris & Company. 

Spratt, W. R., Clerk, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Srill, E. A., 3063 Colorado Ave. 

Steelhammer, A. M., Auditor, Page-Joyce Co. 

Stenn, Benjamin C, Bookkeeper, Hotel Sherman. 

Storke, B. R., Order Department, Russell Brewster & Company. 

Streccius, L. A., Clerk, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. 

Strelow, H. J., Bookkeeper, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique. 

Strohm, E. C, 6632 Honore St. 

Strom, Blaine, Stock Clerk, Chicago & North-Western Ry. 

Sturges, J. C, Clerk, Swift & Company. 

Sullivan, Joseph, Bookkeeper, P. F. Volland & Company. 

Sweeney, G. F., Clerk, Western Union Telegraph Co. 

Takahashi, C. T., Clerk, G. R. Yamada. 

Taylor, Barry, Clerk, American Steel Foundries. 

Teevan, J. C, Clerk, Arthur Young & Co. 

Tessman, August, 2031 Cortez St. 

Thompson, A. C, Motor Trucks, 301-305 N. Halsted St. 

Thulin, Fred, 829 N. 51st Court. 

Toebelman, E. J., Chief Clerk, Russell, Brewster & Co. 

Tonk, P. A., Member Firm, Tonk Manufacturing Company. 

Tonneson, Henry, Bookkeeper, Miehle Printing Press & Mfg. Co. 

Tortorell, J. N., 6813 Paulina St. 

Towle, Miss E. C, Bookkeeper, M. J. & M. L. Rice. 

Turner, W. E., Inspecting Machines, International Harvester Co. 

Turrell, W. O., Bookkeeper, Fairbanks, Morse & Company. 

Tuverson, F. F., Clerk, Swift & Company. 

Twichell, J. J., Accountant, Kabo Corset Company. 

Ullman, J. M., Treasurer, Northern Equipment Company. 

Unger, Samuel, Woolen and Cotton Cuttings, 4946 Champlain Ave. 

Vale, Miss M. L., Clerk, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. 
Vallely, Joseph, American Steel Foundries. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 51 



Valette, Elbert C, Order Clerk, Illinois Steel Company. 

Vanderblue, H. B., 1456 Berwyn Ave. 

Vanderhoeven, F. J., Auditor, Art Bedstead Company. 

Vanderwalker, F. N., Asst. Advertising Mgr., Carter White Lead Company. 

Vasak, Otto, Teller, American State Bank. 

Vavinek, E. J., 609 S. Halsted St. 

Vernon, Miss J. G., 2126 W. Monroe St. 

Vernon, Miss Olive, Agent, American Life Insurance Company. 

Vescelus, C. E., Cashier, Illinois Improvement & Ballast Co. 

Vineyard, P. P., Bookkeeper, Transo Paper Co. 

Voorhees, Miss F. A., Public Accountant, 13 61 E. 57th St. 

Wagner, F. W., Auditor, Dolese Brothers Company. 

Wallace, W. A., Jr., Cost Work, Otis Elevator Company. 

Wallenborn, P. A., Foreman, Chicago Raihvavs Companv. 

Wallin, J. E., Statistical Clerk, Chicago, Rock 'island & Pacific Ry. 

Walter, G. B., Salesman, Julius Kluefer Paper Box Co. 

Watson, James G., Bookkeeper, Englewood Hospital. 

Watson, J. F., Accountant, Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 

Weber, N. W., Advertising Department, Northwestern Yeast Company. 

Webster, A. L., Hide Broker, 154 W. Randolph St. 

Webster, D. F., Credit Man, James H. Rice Company. 

Weiss, G. V., Traveling Salesman, Selz-Schwab & Company. 

Weiss, J. C, Schoen & Schoen. 

Weitzenfeld, D. H., Public Accountant, 1337 N. Western Ave. 

Welin, H. J., Assistant Chief Clerk, Miehle Printing Press & Mfg. Co. 

Wells, Harvey H., 1457 Cuyler Ave. 

Wendel, G. J., Chief Clerk, Emporium World Millinery Company. 

West, H. F., Salesman, Walton & Spencer Company. 

Westberg, F. T., Bookkeeper, Friedman Manufacturing Co. 

Weston, F. A., Advertising Dept., Marshall Field & Company. 

Westphaln, H. G., Clerk, Dept. of Electricity, City of Chicago. 

White, William, Accountant, Cudahy Packing Company. 

Wickens, Charles G., Bookkeeper, Canfield Swigart Company. 

Willard, Burr, Bookkeeper, 3762 Maple Square Ave. 

Willey, C. H., Bookkeeper and Cashier, National Box Company. 

Williams, Percival L., Clerk, Commonwealth Edison Company. 

Wilson, A., Clerk, Morris & Company. 

Wilson, H. E., Bonds and Mortgages, J. L. Wilson & Sons. 

Wilson, J. L., J. L. Wilson & Sons. 

Winn, G. N., Clerk, Alfred L. Baker & Company. 

Woldhausen, W. L., Clerk, Sears, Roebuck & Company. 

Wolma, J. D., Clerk, Swift & Company. 

Wood, E. W., Clerk, Chicago Telephone Company. 

Wright, H. G., Stenographer, Pocahontas Coal Sales Co. 

Young, T. H., Clerk, Chicago Railways Co. 

Zillmer, F. G., Salesman, F. H. Hill Company. 

Zimmerman, E. C, Assistant Cashier, Carter White Lead Company. 
Zimmerman, J. F., Office Manager, Jenney, Mundie & Jensen, Architects. 
Zolkowski, E. A., Bookkeeper, North Western Trust & Savings Bank. 



3 0112 105752791 



NORTHWESTERN UNI- 
1X VERSITY BULLETIN 

is published by the University 
weekly during the academic year 
at Evanston, Illinois. Entered at 
the post office at Evanston, Illi- 
nois, as second class mail matter 
under act of Congress of July 16, 

1904. 

Volume XII, Number 41 
June 7, 1912